Procrastination is the act of putting off a task which you know you have to do, even though you know that putting it off will probably be worse for you in the long run. For example, when you procrastinate about starting an assignment it doesn’t make the assignment go away, or the deadline change, it just gives you less time to get the work done. To manage this, students can try the following:

TIPS FOR STUDENTS

  1. Become aware of the excuses you use – make a mental note when you procrastinate. What excuses do you give yourself? Too tired? Too difficult? Too boring? Being aware is the first step in changing your behaviour. Keep yourself honest by asking questions like “is this the best use of my time at the moment?” and “am I doing this as a way of avoiding what I really should be doing?”.
  2. Reduce or eliminate distractions – creating a clear, uncluttered work environment which is free from distractions will help you avoid procrastinating. Turn off your social media or WiFi, turn off your music or TV, close the door. It’s easy to get distracted and lose focus on what you are trying to do, or to procrastinate by surfing websites that are barely related to the topic you are meant to be researching. Schools that subscribe to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au can find out more in the Home Study Environment unit and Dealing with Distractions unit.
  3. Make a prioritised list – before you start work (or procrastinating) take a few minutes to work out what your priorities for the session are, based on your deadlines. Take into account all the time you have available and make a prioritised list. Work on the most important thing first. There is more information in the Time Management Skills unit on techniques for prioritising for schools that subscribe to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au.
  4. Break down projects into chunks – if you have a big task that you have to do, or something that you really don’t want to start, have a think about how it can be broken up into smaller parts. A big assignment might need a plan, the purchase of resources, a trip to the library, internet based research, and then several days to write and edit each section. If you just focus on doing one of these tasks it’s easier to commence.
  5. Just start – stop focusing on getting it done perfectly, or even well, just make a start, even if it’s just for a few minutes. Starting the task makes you realise it’s not as daunting as you originally thought and allows you to make a small amount of progress which encourages you to keep going. Sometimes once you get started you can even do more than you originally thought you could or would.

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how to achieve your personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is an abbreviated version of the tip emailed to the main contact teachers for www.studyskillshandbook.com.au.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog and the email newsletters is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

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STUDY SKILLS TIP #67 – SLEEP

by psalter on August 1, 2015

TOP TIPS FOR A GREAT SLEEP ROUTINE

 Sleep is so important to ensure the learning from the day is consolidated.

  • Have a regular bed time and wake up time. A regular bed time helps to set your body clock so your body knows it’s time to sleep. Waking up at (or near) the same time each day also helps your body to establish a sleep pattern. Get plenty of sunlight during the day too.
  • Establish a bed time ritual. Doing a series of actions before bed also helps your body to prepare for sleep. Ideas include, a warm bath or shower, reading a book, listening to quiet music or doing some gentle stretches.
  • Avoid technology in the hour before bed, including TV, computers and phones.
  • Exercise during the day so that your body is ready for rest at night.
  • Don’t eat big meals at night. Eat as early as possible and try to avoid rich, heavy food close to bed time.
  • Limit your caffeine during the day and don’t drink any caffeine in the afternoon or evening.
  • Don’t have too much liquid in the evening….and if you are drinking, consider a herbal tea like chamomile.
  • Worrying about problems at school or with friends often stops you from getting to sleep. Talk to a trusted person about things that are worrying you to find ways to solve your problems. You could also try some relaxation exercises such as meditation or positive visualisation.
  • Have your room as dark as possible when trying to get to sleep. Use a sleep mask if you need to avoid light e.g. from electronic devices, street lights etc.

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au  you can learn more about how to achieve your personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is an abbreviated version of the tip available on www.studyskillshandbook.com.au – visit the Lifestyle and Balance unit and the section on Sleep.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog and the email newsletters is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

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STUDY SKILLS TIP #66 – BLUE LIGHT

by psalter on July 1, 2015

WHY STUDENTS NEED TO TURN OFF DEVICES AN HOUR BEFORE SLEEP

Artificial light from electronic and other devices generally emit a blue light (it may not actually look blue, but that is the underlying light).  Blue light, along with ultraviolet light is a type of non-visible light at a very short wavelength.  You can see an image of the spectrum here: http://www.bluelightexposed.com/#what-is-blue-light.

What does blue light do to the human body?

Non-visible light has a lot of energy and studies show that a lot of exposure to this type of light can do damage to your eyes and also impair your sleep cycle. During sleep lots of essential physical processes take place and it is also when learning from the day is consolidated in memory. So getting enough sleep is essential for students.

Blue light is naturally generated only during the day, from sunlight.  When it gets dark, naturally occurring blue light ceases, signalling the body to produce melatonin, the hormone associated with sleep. Using artificial lighting and devices which emit a blue light at night confuses the body-clock (the body’s natural sleep-wake cycle) by stopping the body from producing melatonin.  This can result in disrupted sleep patterns including difficulty in falling asleep and staying asleep and shortened sleep duration.

Those at greatest risk from night-time exposure to blue light are those with existing sleep disorders and adolescents who often experience delayed sleep patterns as a result of biological changes.

What can I do to limit my exposure to blue light at night?

Some suggestions include:

  • Be exposed to sunlight during the day to assist in accurately setting your body clock.
  • Stop using all electronic devices preferably at least 2 hours before bed.
  • Turn off all artificial lighting 1-2 hours before bed.
  • Get a red or orange reading lamp, which does not emit blue light.
  • Use blue light blocking glasses at night.
  • Install a program or app on your computer or device to change the type of light it emits. A variety of programs are available including F.lux, EasyEyez, Night Filter, Zzz iPhone filter, Bluelight and Twilight
  • Invert the colours on your iPhone or iPad.
  • Turn the brightness down on your device for a few hours before bed (not perfect, but better than nothing!).

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au  you can learn more about how to achieve your personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog and the email newsletters is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

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STUDY SKILLS TIP #65 – MOVING INFO INTO LONG TERM MEMORY

May 31, 2015

The following are some tips which may help you to move information from short to long term memory. BE ENGAGED: If you are interested in what you are learning you are more likely to remember it. Ask questions, pre-read information, make summaries and follow up on things you don’t understand. USE REPETITION: Repetition is key […]

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STUDY SKILLS TIP #64 – IT’S ALL ABOUT ATTITUDE

May 1, 2015

When students start secondary school, they are usually very positive and optimistic about school. Then things can start to get harder, a bit more challenging, maybe they get a bad mark and become discouraged, or maybe their friends start to influence their attitude. Some students are able to overcome these challenges, while others let it […]

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STUDY SKILLS TIP #63 – MAKING THE MOST OF CLASSTIME

April 1, 2015

So what are the advantages of using classtime efficiently? Well, you will complete more work in class and have less to do at home, your teacher will be pleased with your application and so will your parents when they read your report, and of course, you will learn more! And if you don’t use classtime […]

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STUDY SKILLS TIP #62 – READING FROM SCREENS VERSUS PRINTED MATERIALS

March 1, 2015

Students now spend a lot of time reading from a screen: computers, kindle, mobile devices. The research into the implications of this are still in the early stages, however current evidence indicates that at this point in time print may be slightly superior to the screen in relation to comprehension, learning, retention and ease of […]

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STUDY SKILLS TIP #61 – PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT

February 1, 2015

Whilst parents are often involved in their teenager’s sporting, musical or dramatic activities, parental support on the sidelines of their adolescent child’s studies can also be beneficial, particularly to academic performance. Research shows that children are more likely to succeed if parents are involved in their learning. Hendersen and Mapp (2002) found that ‘the more […]

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STUDY SKILLS TIP #60 – GAMING AND THE ADOLESCENT BRAIN

January 2, 2015

What are electronic games doing to the adolescent brain? Mobile and handheld technologies provide great opportunities for learning.  However, with the vast number of electronic games also available, it is easy for students to become distracted by these games at any hour of the day or night and in any location.  Globally, addiction to electronic […]

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STUDY SKILLS TIP #59 – MAKING THE MOST OF THE YEARLY REPORT

December 1, 2014

TIPS ON MAKING THE MOST OF THE END OF YEAR SCHOOL REPORT 1. Before the report arrives home, write your own school report. Make up a grid similar to this (below) for all subjects, and pretend to be the teacher and write about yourself. You could also create a grid that simulates your previous school report. Subject […]

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